Dread Topiary of Ras Thavas

'O friend and companion of night, thou who rejoicest in the baying of dogs and spilt blood, who wanderest in the midst of shades among the tombs, who longest for blood and bringest terror to mortals, Gorgo, Mormo, thousand-faced moon, look favourably on our sacrifices!'

Daniel Gorringe

This is my awful, fucking, shitty, own-art tumblr. Look at it anyway, because, in a fit of misanthropy, I apparently want people to suffer.

I’m also taking commissions!

Late European harness in its’ full, gaudy, tasteless glory.While this set, with its’ late date of commission (1650, for the Elector John George of Saxony) and heavy embossing, is unlikely a true field armour, the level of remarkably preserved overall flair, bling and feather-dusting glory is entirely in keeping with armours worn in the field during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries- the apogee of plate armours. We can see this quite easily from artwork of the time, such as this depiction of the Battle of Pavia- 
- or late engravings of Albrecht Durer. The stripped down, no-frills, white metal look we now associate with these armours comes from the same irresponsible 18th-19th curation practices that carefully rubbed the paint from classical sculpture. The removal of bright textiles and harsh over-polishing to remove gilding, blueing and paint made these armours look the way a drab modern gent thought they should; sterile, utile, and conservatively manly.
Eat that, you stuffy gits. Especially you, Beau Brummel.

Late European harness in its’ full, gaudy, tasteless glory.
While this set, with its’ late date of commission (1650, for the Elector John George of Saxony) and heavy embossing, is unlikely a true field armour, the level of remarkably preserved overall flair, bling and feather-dusting glory is entirely in keeping with armours worn in the field during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries- the apogee of plate armours. We can see this quite easily from artwork of the time, such as this depiction of the Battle of Pavia- 

- or late engravings of Albrecht Durer. The stripped down, no-frills, white metal look we now associate with these armours comes from the same irresponsible 18th-19th curation practices that carefully rubbed the paint from classical sculpture. The removal of bright textiles and harsh over-polishing to remove gilding, blueing and paint made these armours look the way a drab modern gent thought they should; sterile, utile, and conservatively manly.

Eat that, you stuffy gits. Especially you, Beau Brummel.